The unoriginal victimhood rhetoric from Shapiro conceals legitimate criticism against him.

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Image taken from WikiCommons

Controversy struck Politico, on Thursday, when the firebrand and right-wing commentator Ben Shapiro was probed to write their famous daily newsletter, Playbook. In his addition to the acclaimed newsletter, Shapiro argued that the reason many Republicans refused to impeach Trump was a general and widespread belief that liberals and lefties more generally were out to destroy them politically. In reaction, many internal staffers at Politico criticized the decision, with one reporter from the news organization calling Shapiro a pundit with “a long history of bigoted and incendiary commentary…” Shapiro’s response was predictable, and he did not disappoint. For several, Shapiro retweeted comment after comment, meme after meme taking shots at his critics over the affair. Directing his ire at the staffers, Shapiro rebuked them, arguing that the Politico staffers were proving his point about leftists censoring conservatives. …


A dishonest argument in the New York Post needs some correcting

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Image taken from Wiki Commons

America is reeling. It is reeling from a horrid attempt to overthrow the United States Government and a constitutionally-mandated certification process. It is reeling because the United States President can not be trusted to avoid inciting a riot, much less indulging conspiracy theories that precipitated a said riot. America is reeling because 147 Republican members of the House of Representatives voted to overturn an election, legitimizing an insurrection that killed five people. One of those killed in the violence was Capitol police officer Brian Sicknick. Sicknick has become a symbol of the loss and pain of the violence on capitol hill to many. On Sunday, MSNBC did a live broadcast of the procession carrying Sicknick’s body, a sign that shows just how dangerous conspiracy theories are. This officer died fighting to defend the capitol from insurrectionists who would besiege it. Indeed, much of the conversation surrounding Sicknick’s death has been directly related to the threat of terrorism and its presence among the Right. In a way, Sicknick’s death is an opportunity for reform and reflection. …


Removing Mitch is the best way forward.

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Image taken from Pixabay

For the last two days, I have been writing about how our society needs to change its thinking. Specifically, I have been focused on the way we think about government and its role in American society. Much of my recent commentary is focused on the role of America’s body politic, how it views itself, and how it views the people in power more generally. And while I stand by those recent writings, I can not deny that they are only part of the picture. In the recent two months, it has become increasingly obvious that there has been a cancer eating at the heart of American democracy. Not one group, not one faction. One man. Mitch McConnell. …


The appeal of inexperience in politics must end.

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Photo by Joshua Sukoff on Unsplash

I have heard it said that all bad things have a lesson behind them. Maybe that’s true. Maybe not. But suppose any of us are going to recover from the now floundering Trump administration and its self-destructive legacy. In that case, we must learn from the administration and its effect on our body politic. There are many lessons that I, along with many other Americans, have been forced to learn. But the one that sticks out to me lies in the idea of the outsider politician. It was a noxious idea from the beginning, and it has proven to be a disaster with the current occupant of the White House. …


America needs a new paradigm for governance

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Image taken from Pixabay

Republican obstructionism continued on Tuesday, as Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell blocked yet another attempt by Democrats to provide $2,000 in stimulus to desperate Americans. The battle over the stimulus probably won’t end with that one vote and may carry on into next week, but Americans will continue to suffer in the meantime. Republicans in the Senate will likely argue that it is important not to add to the debt. And it is tempting to indulge that argument, to refute it with allegations of hypocrisy. Many would rightly point out that the Republicans have never taken the debt seriously during Trump’s presidency. One might be tempted to point to the rising deficit under Trump — even without Covid-19. Some may argue that Trump’s policies will add to the debt down the line. These points have validity to them, but they assume the argument is in good faith or that the debt is the central part of Republican thinking. At its core, the debt is an excuse to treat the government and the American people’s general welfare as optional. …


Accusations of socialist plots have a sordid history in America that needs to be recognized.

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Dalton and Cleo Trumbo before the HUAC, 1947. Image taken from WikiCommons

For several decades now, Republican operatives have been labeling Democratic politicians as socialists or simply socialistic in their policies. In particular, former President Barack Obama was targeted by conservatives as being a socialist, with one writer, Aaron Klein, writing an entire book dedicated to that premise. Rush Limbaugh, the famed conservative radio host, lambasted then-candidate Mitt Romney for his unwillingness to call Obama a socialist on his website. Such a response, of course, doesn’t accurately represent the ideological perspective that Obama held and dismayed many legitimate socialists — Marxist or otherwise. Even now, Biden is being accused of supporting socialists. But more than that, they were part of a dark history within the American right-wing sphere that continues to this day. …


The recent pandemic may be coming to a close, but America needs to keep fighting.

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Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash

This year has been unlike any other. For many, it has been a hailstorm of disaster, loss, and pain. For others, it has been a confusing halt on a normal life, while some have found it to be only a mild inconvenience. Whatever your experience, it is safe to say that the arrival of Covid-19 uprooted many foundational parts of daily life. It has rocked America to its core. Many have sacrificed their normal lives to help crush the curve, to end the plague that infects our society. And those sacrifices are commendable, but the fight must continue. …


How the Model Minority Myth harms race relations

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Anti-Chinese Propaganda.

With the rise of social justice and the Black Lives Matter movement, much of the discussion surrounding racial equality and justice has been related to police brutality and violence against Black and Brown people. Despite this, the conversation surrounding subtler but no less nefarious aspects of racism in American society goes unnoticed or is actively disregarded by arguments that, while seemingly reasonable, obscure racism in this country. One such argument is the idea of the Model Minority. …


Civility is only good when both sides agree to partake in it

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Image taken from Wikicommons

The Trump administration’s time is running out, and with only a few months left in office, Trump’s power over the nation, as well as his appeal, has begun to decline. In the absence of the once potent President’s presence, questions arise about our nation’s future and what a Biden administration will look like. Some are hopeful that a new day of bipartisanship will rise over the ashes of our divided nation. Indeed, the Chicago Tribune published an article by its editorial board, commending America for voting for a new day. Much of the article endorsed the idea that Trump’s absence would ensure the dignity of America’s body politic. The Tribune was so rosy in its appraisals of America that it conveniently ignored the fact that millions of Americans still voted for the divisive man they were in the process of condemning, saying, “This victory is a testament to the enduring hope of most Americans that, despite their differences, they can still join together for common goals.” The Tribune was not alone in its praise and rosy depiction. George W. Bush, who had his own experience with avoiding the popular will of America, congratulating Biden on his victory in a statement that read: “Though we have political differences, I know Joe Biden to be a good man, who has won his opportunity to lead and unify our country.” Such hopes are great signs for the country, at least on their face. But the reality is far crueler. …


Stacy Abrams’ tireless work in Georgia and across the country requires the Democrats respect.

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Stacey Abrams, 2018. Image taken from Wiki Commons

With Joe Biden’s victory over Donald Trump, many Democrats are feeling elated. And rightly so, Trump’s administration deserves to fall in the most spectacular way possible. Many danced in the streets, trampling the ashes of Trump’s prejudicial administration. But let’s not kid ourselves. My fellow Democrats owe their Black constituents a lot. Despite being 13 percent of the population, Black voters are a massive voter base for Democrats. It would be safe to say that Democratic power resides with Black voters. However, very few Black people and activists are given due credit for their contributions to the Democrat party. Much less given the support, they need to gain their desired results. …

About

Conor Kelly

Conor Kelly is a politics and history major currently enrolled at Loras College. His interests include politics, and history. Support me here:https://ko-fi.com/

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